Lone Hand Western - Old West History

Victorian Ballads

Here is the first posting of a large number of American songs and ballads from the 1800's or Victorian era.  The songs listed below are English and Scottish ballads that were popular at the time.  The melodies for many of these songs were likely to have carried over into other songs of the period.  Song like Barbara Allen are popular even today.

Victorian Ballads - Englis and Scottish

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Victorian Songs   Victorian Ballads   Civil War Songs   Civil War Songs - Confederate

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Victorian Ballads - Englis and Scottish

JOHNNY RANDALL

"Where was you last night, Johnny Randall, my son?
Where was you last night, my heart's loving one?"
"A-fishing, a-fowling; mother, make my bed soon,
For I'm sick at my heart, and I fain would lie down."

"What had you for breakfast, my own pretty boy?
What had you for breakfast, my heart's loving joy?"
"Fresh trout and slow poison; mother, make my bed
soon, For I'm sick at my heart, and I fain would lie down."

"What will you will your brother, my own pretty boy?
What will you will your brother, my heart's loving joy?"
"My horse and my saddle; mother, make my bed soon,
For I'm sick at my heart, and I fain would lie down."

"What will you will your sister, my own pretty boy?
What will you will your sister, my heart's loving joy?"
"My watch and my fiddle, mother make my bed soon,
For I'm sick at my heart, and I fain would lie down."

"What will you will your mother, my own pretty boy,
What will you will your mother, my heart's loving joy?"
"A twisted hemp rope, for to hang her up high;
Mother, make my bed easy till I lie down and die."

JIMMY RANDOLPH

"What you will to your father, Jimmy Randolph my son?
What you will to your father, my oldest, dearest one?"
"My horses, my buggies, mother make my bed soon,
For I am sick-hearted, and I want to lie down."

"What you will to your brothers, Jimmy Randolph my son?
What you will to your brothers, my oldest dearest one?"
"My mules and my waggons, mother make my bed soon,
For I am sick-hearted, and I want to lie down."

"What you will to your sisters, Jimmy Randolph my son,
What you will to your sisters, my oldest dearest one?"
"My gold and my silver, mother make my bed soon,
For I am sick-hearted and I want to lie down."

LORD LOVEL

Lord Lovel was standing at his castle gate,
A-combing his milk-white steed,
When up stepped Lady Nancy Belle,
A-wishing her lover good speed, speed, speed,
A-wishing her lover good speed.

"Where are you going, Lord Lovel?" she said,
"Where are you going?" said she.
"I'm going, my love," Lord Lovel replied.
"New countries for to see, see, see,
New countries for to see."

Lord Lovel was gone just a year and a day,
New countries for to see,
When languishing thoughts came over his mind,
Lady Nancy he must go see, see, see,
Lady Nancy he must go see.

He mounted upon his milk-white steed,
And rode to far London town.
And there he heard St. Patrick's bells,
And the people came mouining, around, round, round,
And the people came mourning around.

"O who hath died?" Lord Lovel said,
"0 who hath died?" said he.
"A lady hath died," a woman replied,
"And they call her Lady Nancy, -cy, -cy,
And they call her Lady Nancy."

He ordered her grave to be opened wide,
Her shroud to be folded down,
And there he kissed her pale cold cheeks
Till the tears came trinkling down, down, down,
Till the tears came trinkling down.

Lady Nancy she died on Good Friday,
Lord Lovel he died on the morrow;
Lady Nancy she died for pure true love,
Lord Lovel he died for sorrow.

 

LORD LOVER

"Oh where are you going, Lord Lover," said she,
"0h where are you going?" said she.
"I am going, my Lady Nancy Bell,
Foreign countries for to see."

"How long will you be gone, Lord Lover?" said she,
"How long will you be gone?" said she.
"A year or two or, the fartherest, three,
Then return to my Lady Nancy."

He had not been gone but a year and a day,
Foreign countries for to see,
Till wondering thoughts came over him,
"Lady Nancy Bell I must go see."

He rode and he rode on his mule quite stay,
Till he come to London town.
And there he heard St. Patrick's bells
And the people all morning around.

"0 what is the matter?" Lord Lover, said he,
"O what is the matter?" said he.
"Lord, a lady is dead," an old lady said,
"And her name was Lady Nancy."

He ordered her grave to be opened wide,
Her shroud to be torn down,
And there he kissed her cold pale lips,
Till the tears came trinkling down.

Lady Nancy was buried in the cold church ground.
Lord Lover was buried close by her;
And out of her bosom there grew a rose,
And out of Lord Lover's a briar.

They grew and they grew to the church steeple high,
Till they could grow no higher.
And there they tied in a true lover's knot
For all true lovers to admire.

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BARBERY ALLEN

It was early in the month of May,
The rosebuds they were swelling;
Little Jimmy Grooves on his deathbed lay
For the love of Barbery Allen.

He sent his servant into the town
Where she'd been lately dwelling,
Saying, "Bring to me those beautiful cheeks,
If her name be Barbery Allen."

So he arose and he left the room
Where she'd been lately dwelling,
Saying, "You've been called upon this eve,
If your name be Barbery Allen."

Then she arose and went to the room
Where Jimmy was a-lying,
And these were the words she seemed to say:
"Young man, I think you're dying."

"That's so, that's so, my love," said he,
"I'm in a low condition;
One kiss from you would comfort me
If your name be Barbery Allen."

"One kiss from me you'll never receive
Although you are a-dying";
And every tongue did seem to say
"Hard-hearted Barbery Allen."

"0 don't you remember a long time ago,
Way down in yonder tavern,
Where you drank your health to the ladies all,
But you slighted Barbery Allen?"

"Yes, I remember a long time ago,
Way down in yonder tavern,
Where I drank my health to the ladies all;
But my love was to Barbery Allen."

She had not gone more than half a mile
Till she saw the corpse a-coming;
Saying, "Lay those corpse before my eyes
That I may look upon them."

The more she looked the more she wept,
Till she burst out a-crying;
And then she kissed those tear cold cheeks
That she refused when dying.

"0 mamma, mamma, go make my bed,
Go make it long and narrow;
Little Jimmy Grooves has died of love,
And I will die of sorrow.

"O mamma, mamma, go make my bed,
Go make it long and narrow;
Little Jimmy Grooves has died today,
And I will die tomorrow."

Little Jimmy was buried in the new churchyard
And Barbery close beside him,
And out of his grave grew a red rose,
And out of hers a briar.

They grew and grew to the old church top
Till they both could grow no higher,
And they both were tied in a true-lover's knot,
The red rose and the briar.

BARBARA ALLEN

Honor, Honor, is the town
In which three maids were dwelling.
There is only one I call my own,
Her name is Barbara Allen.

He sent his servant to her town
And he sent him to her dwelling.
"My master, O he's very sick
For the love of Barbara Allen."

Slowly, slowly she rose up,
And to his bedside was going.
She pulled the curtains to aside
And said "Young man, you're a-dying."

He stretched out his pale white hand,
Expecting to touch hers,
She hopped and skipped all over the floor
And "Young man, I won't have ye."

Sweet William died on Saturday night,
And Barbara on Sunday.
The Old Woman died last of all,
She died on Easter Monday.

THE TWO SISTERS

"O sister, O sister, come go with me,
Go with me down to the sea."

Jury flower gent the rose-berry,
The jury hangs over the rose-berry.

She picked her up all in her strong arms
And threwed her sister into the sea.

"O sister, 0 sister, give me your glove,
And you may have my own true love.

"O sister, 0 sister, give me your hand,
And you may have my house and land."

"O sister, 0 sister, I'll not give you my hand,
And I will have your house and land."

O the farmer's wife was sitting on a rock.
Tying and a-sewing of a black silk knot.

"0 farmer, 0 farmer, run here and see
What's this a-floating here by me."

"It's no fish and it's no swan,
For the water's drowned a gay lady."

The farmer run with his great hook
And hooked this fair lady out of the sea.

"0 what will we do with her fingers so small?"
"We'll take them and we'll make harp screws."

"0 what will we do with her hair so long?"
"We'll take it and we'll make harp strings."

O the farmer was hung by the gallows so high,
And the sister was burned at the stake close by.

THE OLD MAN IN THE NORTH COUNTREE

There was an old man in the North Countree,
Bow down
There was an old man in the North Countree,
And a bow 'twas unto me
There was an old man in the North Countree,
He had daughters one, two, three.
I'll be true to my love if my love is true to me.

There was a young man came a-courting
And he made choice of the youngest one.

He gave his love a beaver cape;
The second she thought much of that.

"Sister, 0 sister, let us go down
And see the ships go sailing by."

As they was a-walking by the saucy brimside
The oldest pushed the youngest in.

"Sister, O sister lend me your hand, a
And I'll give you my house and land."

"What care I for house and lands?
All that I want is your true love's hand."

Down she sunk and away she swam
Till she came to the miller's mill-dam.

The miller ran out with his fish-hook
And fished the maiden out of the brook.

"The miller shall be hung on his own mill-gate
For drownding my poor sister Kate."

THE JEWISH LADY

It rained a mist, it rained a mist,
It rained all over the land;
Till all the boys throughout the town
Went out to toss their ball, ball, ball,
Went out to toss their ball.

At first they tossed their ball too high,
And then again too low,
Till over in the Jewish garden it fell,
Where no one was darst to go, go, go,
Where no one was darst to go.

Out came a Jewish lady,
All dressed so gay and fine.
"Come in, my pretty little boy," she said,
"And you shall have your ball, ball, ball,
And you shall have your ball."

At first she showed him a yellow apple dish,
And a gay gold ring,
And then a cherry as red as blood,
To entice this little boy in, in, in,
To entice this little boy in.

She took him by his little white hand,
And led him through the hall,
And then unto a cellar so deep,
Where no one could hear him lament, lament,
Where no one could hear him lament.

"If any of my playmates should call for me,
You may tell them that I'm asleep;
But if my mother should call for me,
You may tell her that I am dead,
And buried with a prayer-book at my feet,
And a bible at my head, head, head,
And a bible at my head."

THE JEW LADY

My ball flew over in a Jew's garden,
Where no one dared to go,
I saw a Jew lady in a green silk dress
A-standing by the do'.

"Come in, come in, my pretty little boy,
You may have your ball again."
"I won't, I won't, I won't come in,
Because my heart is blood."

She took me then by her lily-white hand,
And led me in the kitchen,
She sot me down on a golden chair,
And fed me on sugar and rice.

She took me then by her lily-white hand,
And led me in the kitchen,
She laid me down on a golden plank,
And stobbed me like a sheep.

"You lay my Bible at my head,
And my prayer book at my feet,
And if any of my playmates they ask for me,
Just tell them I've gone to sleep."

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THE WIFE WRAPPED IN A WETHER'S SKIN

Sweet William married him a wife,
Jennifer June and the Rosemaree
To be the sweet comfort of his life.
As the dew flies over the green vallee.

It's she couldn't into the kitchen go,
For fear of soiling her white-heeled shoes.

It's she couldn't wash and she wouldn't bake,
For fear of soiling her white apron-tape.

It's she couldn't card and she wouldn't spin,
For fear of spoiling her delicate skin.

Sweet William came whistling in from the plow;
Says, "0 my dear wife, is my dinner ready now?"

She called him a dirty paltry whelp:
"If you want any dinner, go get it yourself."

Sweet William went out unto the sheepfold,
And out a fat wether he did pull.

Upon his knees he did kneel down,
And soon from it did strip the skin.

He laid the skin on his wife's back
And he made the stick go whickety whack.

"I'll tell my father and all his kin
How you this quarrel did begin."

"You may tell your father and all your kin
How I have thrashed my fat wether's skin."

Sweet William came whistling in from the plow,
Says, "0 my dear wife, is my dinner ready now?"

She drew her table and spread her board,
And 'twas "0 my dear husband," with every word.

And now they live free from all care and strife,
And now she makes William a very good wife.

DANDOO

A little old man lived in the west,
Dandoo, dandoo
A little old man lived in the west,
Clamadore clash may clings
A little old man lived in the west,
He had a little wife that was none of the best.
And a lambo scrambo churum churum
Calla may clash may clings.

This little old man came in from his plow,
Saying, "Honey have you got my breakfast now?"

"There lays a piece of cold bread on the shelf.
If you want any more you can get it yourself."

He drew the old wether up to the pin,
And at three jerks fetched off his skin.

He threw the sheep's skin around his wife's back,
And two little sticks went whickety whack.

CHILDREN'S SONG

The starry light and the lady bright,
Her children she had three.
She sent them away to the North country
To learn those gramerie.

They hadn't been gone but a very short time,
Scarce three months and a day,
Till death came rushing along over the land
And swept those babes away.

Then- mother came as far to know,
She wrung her hands full sore.
"The less, the less, the less!" she cried,
"Shall I see my babes no more?"

"There were a king in heaven," she said,
"That used to wear a crown;
Send all my three little babes tonight
Or in the morning soon."

Or Christmas times were drawing nigh,
The nights were long and cold;
Her three little babes came rushing along
Down to their mother's hall.

She fixed them a table in the dining room,
Spread over with bread and wine;
Saying, "Eat, 0, eat my sweet little babes;
Come eat and drink of mine."

"Mama, we cannot eat your bread,
Nor we can't drink your wine;
For yonder stands our Saviour dear,
And to him we'll return."

She fixed them a bed in the backmost room,
Spread over with a clean sheet,
And a golden wine upon the top of them
To make them sweeter sleep.

"Take it off, take it off," says the oldest one,
"The cocks they will soon crow;
For yonder stands our Saviour dear,
And to him we must go.

"Cold clods lays on our feet, mama;
Green grass grows over our heads;
The tears that run all down our cheeks
Did wet the winding sheets."

THREE LITTLE BABES

Christmas time was drawing near
And the nights were growing cold,
When three little babes came running down
Into their mother's fold.

She spread a table long and wide,
And on it put bread and wine.
"Come eat, come drink, my sweet little babes;
Come eat and drink of mine."

"We want none of your bread, mother,
We want none of your wine,
For yonder stands our blessed Lord
And to Him we will join."

She made a bed in the very best room,
And on it put clean sheets,
And over the top a golden spread,
The sweeter they might sleep.

"Take it off, take it off," cried the eldest one,
"Take it off," cried he,
"For I would not stay in this wicked world,
Since Christ has died for me.

"A sad farewell, kind mother dear,
We give the parting hand,
To meet again on that fair shore
In Canaan's happy land.

"A tombstone at our head, mother,
The cold clay at our feet;
The tears we have shed for you, mother,
Have wet these winding sheets."

THE CRUEL BROTHER

Three ladies played at cup and ball,—
With a hey! and my lily gay!
Three knights there came among them all.
The rose it smells so sweetly.

And one of them was dressed in green,—
He asked me to be his queen.

And one of them was dressed in yellow,—
He asked me to be his fellow.

And one of them was dressed in red,—
He asked me with him to wed.

"But you must ask my father the King,
And you must ask my mother the Queen,—

"And you must ask my sister Anne,
And you must ask my brother John."

"I have asked your father the King,
And I have asked your mother the Queen,—

"And I have asked your sister Anne,
And I have asked your brother John."

Her father led her down the stairs,
Her mother led her down the hall.

Her sister Anne led her down the walk,
Her brother John put her on her horse.

And as she stooped to give him a kiss,
He stuck a penknife into her breast.

"Ride up, ride up, my foremost man!
Methinks my lady looks pale and wan!"

"O what will you leave to your father the King?"
"The golden coach that I ride in."

"And what will you leave to your mother the Queen?"
"The golden chair that I sit in."

"And what will you leave to your sister Anne?"
"My silver brooch and golden fan."

"And what will you leave to your brother John?"
"A pair of gallows to hang him on."

"And what will you leave to your brother John's wife?"
"Grief and misfortune all her life."

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EDWARD

"How come that blood on your shirt sleeve,
Pray son, now tell to me?"
"It is the blood of the old greyhound,
That run young fox for me."

"It is too pale for that old greyhound,
Pray son, now tell to me."
"It is the blood of the old grey mare,
That ploughed that corn for me."

"It is too pale for that old grey mare,
Pray son, now tell to me."
"It is the blood of my youngest brother
That hoed that corn for me."

"What did you fall out about,
Pray son, now tell to me?"
'Because he cut yon holly bush
Which might have made a tree."

"0h what will you tell to your father dear,
When he comes home from town?"
"I'll set my foot in yonder ship
And sail the ocean round."

"0h what will you do with your sweet little wife;
Pray son, now tell to me?"
"I'll set her foot in yonder ship
To keep me company."

"0h what will you do with your three little babes,
Pray son, now tell to me?"
"I'll leave them here, in the care of you,
For to keep you company."

"0h what will you do with your house and your land,
Pray son, now tell to me?"
"I'll leave it here, in care of you,
For to set my children free."

THE LOWLANDS LOW

Up then spake our noble cabin boy,
Saying, "What will you give me if I will them destroy?
If I will them destroy, send them floating o'er the tide,
And sink them in the Lowlands, the Lowlands low,
And sink them in the Lowlands low?"

"0h the man that them destroys," the captain made reply,
"A fortune he shall have and my daughter to wife,
A fortune he shall have and my daughter beside,
If he'll sink them in the Lowlands, the Lowlands low,
If he'll sink them in the Lowlands low."

The one was playing at cards and the other playing at dice,
The boy swam up and he scuttled them so nice,
He scuttled them so nice, sent them floating with the tide,
And sank them in the Lowlands low,
And sank them in the Lowlands low.

The boy swam first unto the starboard side,
Saying, "Captain pick me up for I'm wearied with the tide,
0 Captain pick me up for I'm wearied with the tide
And I'm sinking in the Lowlands, the Lowlands low,
And I'm sinking in the Lowlands low."

"Oh no," replied the Captain, "I will not pick you up,
I will sink you, I will shoot you, send you floating with
the tide, I will sink you, I will shoot you, send you floating with
the tide,
And I'll sink you in the Lowlands, the Lowlands low,
And I'll sink you in the Lowlands low."

The boy swam round unto the larboard side,
Saying, "Messmates, pick me up, for I'm wearied with
the tide, O messmates, pick me up for I'm wearied with the tide.
And I'm sinking in the Lowlands, the Lowlands low,
And I'm sinking in the Lowlands low."

His messmates picked him up, and on the deck he died.
They sewed him up in his hammock so wide,
They sewed him up, sent him floating with the tide,
And they sank him in the Lowlands, the Lowlands low,
And they sank him in the Lowlands low.

THREE SAILOR BOYS

Up spoke the man of our gallant ship,
And a well spoken man was he,
Saying, "I married me a wife in a far distant town,
And tonight a widow she will be, be, be,
And tonight a widow she will be."

For the roaring sea, they do roar, O roar,
And the stormy winds they do blow,
As the three poor sailor boys they were mounted up aloft,
While the love land was lying down below, down below,
While the love land was lying down below.

Up spoke the boy of our gallant ship,
And a well spoken boy was he,
Saying, "I have a true love in a far distant town,
And tonight she'll be wailing for me, for me,
And tonight she'll be wailing for me."

Up spoke the girl of our gallant ship,
And a well spoken girl was she,
Saying, "I have been used to sleeping on a soft feather bed,
And tonight on the bottom of the sea, the sea,
And tonight on the bottom of the sea."

Up spoke the cook of our gallant ship,
And a greasy old thing was she,
Saying, "I can have more fun with my kettles and my pots
Than to sink to the bottom of the sea, the sea,
Than to sink to the bottom of the sea."

Six times around sails our gallant ship,
Six times around sails she,
Six times around sails our gallant ship,
And she sank to the bottom of the sea, the sea,
And she sank to the bottom of the sea.

LORD THOMAS

Lord Thomas he was a bold forester,
The chaser of the king's deer;
Fair Ellen she was a sweet young lady,
Lord Thomas he loved her dear.

"Come riddle my riddle, dear mother," he said,
"Come riddle it all in one,
Whether I shall marry fair Ellen or no
Or bring the brown girl home."

"The brown girl she has houses and land,
Fair Ellen she has none,
So I advise you with my blessing
To bring the brown girl home."

Lord Thomas he dressed in scarlet red,
His merry men all were seen,
And as he rode along the street,
They took him to be a king.

He rode till he came to fair Ellen's gate,
He knocked loud at the ring,
And who was there but fair Ellen herself
To let Lord Thomas in?

"What news, what news?" fair Ellen said,
"What news have you brought me?"
"I've come to invite you to my wedding,
Most miserable news for thee."

"0 God forbid," fair Ellen she said,
"That such a thing should be done,
I thought to be the bride myself
And thou shouldst be the groom."

"Come riddle my riddle, dear mother," she said,
"Come riddle it all in one,
Whether I shall go to Lord Thomas' wedding, '
Or shall I stay at home?"

"Oh to Lord Thomas' wedding don't go,
To Lord Thomas' wedding don't go;
As many as are your friends, dear daughter,
There's more will be your foes."

"To Lord Thomas' wedding I'll go," she said,
"To Lord Thomas' wedding I'll go,
If it costs my heart's blood, body and all,
To Lord Thomas' wedding I'll go."

Fair Ellen she dressed in scarlet red,
Her merry maids all were seen,
And as she rode along the street
They took her to be a queen.

She rode till she came to Lord Thomas' gate,
She knocked loud at the ring.
And who was there but Lord Thomas himself
To let fair Ellen in.

He took her by her lily-white hand,
He led her through the hall;
He placed her on the noblest chair
Among the ladies all.

"Is this your bride?" fair Ellen said,
"I think she is wonderful brown,
You might have had as fair a young lady
As ever put foot on ground."

"Despise her not," Lord Thomas he said,
"Despise her not unto me;
Better I love your little finger
Than the brown girl's whole body."

The brown girl she had a little pen-knife,
It was both keen and sharp;
Betwixt the long ribs and the short
She pierced fair Ellen's heart.

"What ails, what ails?" Lord Thomas he said.
"I think you are wonderful pale;
You used to have so fair a color,
As ever a rose could bloom."

"0h are you blind," fair Ellen said,
"Or can you not very well see?
0h don't you see my own heart's blood
Go trickling down my knee?"

Lord Thomas he had a two-edged sword,
He flourished it all around;
He took the brown girl's head from the shoulders
And threw it to the ground.

He put the handle on the ground,
The point was towards his heart.
Those three true lovers they very well met,
But sadly they did depart.

"0h dig my grave," Lord Thomas he said,
"Dig it both wide and deep,
And lay fair Ellen in my arms,
And the brown girl at my feet."

Out of Lord Thomas there grew a golden briar,
And out of fair Ellen a thorn;
Those three true lovers they very well met,
But better they'd never been born.

THE HANGMAN'S SONG

"Hangman, hangman, slack up your rope,
0h slack it for a while,
I looked over yonder and I see Paw coming,
He's walked for many a long mile."

"Say Paw, say Paw, have you brung me any gold,
Any gold for to pay my fine?"
"No sir, no sir, I've brung you no gold,
No gold for to pay your fine,
But I'm just come for to see you hanged,
Hanged on the gallows line."

"O you won't love and it's hard to be beloved
And it's hard to make up your time,
You have broke the heart of many a true love,
True love, but you won't break mine."

"Hangman, hangman, slack up your rope,
O slack it for a while,
I looked over yonder and I see Maw coming,
She's walked for many a long mile."

"Say Maw, say Maw, have you brought me any gold,
Any gold for to pay my fine?"
"No sir, no sir, I've brought you no gold,
No gold for to pay your fine,

But I'm just come for to see you hanged,
Hanged on the gallows line."
"O you won't love and it's hard to be beloved,
And it's hard to make up your time,
You have broken the heart of many a true love,
True love, but you won't break mine."

"Hangman, hangman, slack up your rope,
0 slack it for a while,
I looked over yonder and I see my sweetheart coming,
She's walked for many a long mile."

"Sweetheart, sweetheart, have you brought me any gold,
Any gold for to pay my fine?"
"Yes sir, yes sir, I've brought you some gold,
Some gold for to pay your fine,
For I'm just come for to take you home,
From on the gallows line."

LORD BAYHAM

Lord Bayham was a brave young man,
He was as brave as brave could be;
He grew oneasy and discontented
Till he had taken a voyage to sea.

He was blown east, he was blown west,
He was blown to some Turkish shore,
Where the Turks they got him and sorely used him;
He vowed for freedom any more.

They bored a hole through his left shoulder,
And bound him fast unto a tree,
And gave him nothing but bread and water,
Bread and water once a day.

The Turks they had one only daughter,
She was as fair as fair could be;
She stole the keys of her father's prison,
And vowed Lord Bayham she would set free.

"0 have you land, or have you living,
Or have you houses, many, free,
That you could give to a Turkish lady
If out of prison she'd set you free?"

"Yes, I have land and I have living,
And I have houses, many free,
I'll give them all to you, pretty creature,
If out of prison you'll set me free."

She led him down to her father's cellar,
And drawed to him the best port wine,
And drank a health; those words did follow,
"Lord Bayham, if you were but mine!"

O now the notes of love were drawn,
And seven years they were to stand;
He was to marry no other woman,
Unless she married some other man.

She led him down to the sea shore,
And sat him sailing on the main.
"Farewell, farewell, my own dear jewel,
When shall I see your fair face again!"

Seven years were gone and past,
And seven weeks and almost three,
She bundled up her silks and rubies,
And vowed Lord Bayham she would see.

And when she got to Lord Bayham's gate,
She knocked so loud she made it ring.
"Who's there? Who's there?" cried the young
proud porter,
"That knocks so loud and won't come in."

"Is this Lord Bayham's land and living?
Or is Lord Bayham himself at home?"
"This is Lord Bayham's land and living.
He has this day fetched a young bride home."

"I've a gold ring on every finger,
And on my middle finger three.
I'll give them all to you, young proud porter,
If you will do one thing for me. . . .

"Go down into your father's cellar,
And draw to me the best port wine,
And drink a health to a prince's daughter,
Who freed you from your prison bound."

He went unto his master dear,
And fell low down upon his knees.
"Rise up, rise up, you young proud porter,
What news have you brought unto me?"

"This seven weeks I kept your gates,
And seven weeks and almost three,
There's the fairest lady stands at your gates
That ever my two eyes did see.

"She has a gold ring on every ringer,
And on the middle finger three;
She has more fine gold around her waist
Than would buy old England, France, and thee."

Lord Bayham rose upon his feet,
And split his table in pieces three, Saying,
"I'll forfeit all my land and Irving
That the Turkish lady has crossed the sea."

Then up bespoke the young bride's mother,
Those words in anger she did say;
"Would you forsake my own dear daughter,
And marry a Turkish lady?"

He says, "Here is your daughter as I got her.
I'm sure she is none the worse of me.
She came to me on a horse and saddle,
I'll send her home in her coach and three."

He took Susan by her little white hands,
And led her down the golden stream,
And changed her name from lovely Susan,
And called her Lord Bayham's queen.

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LITTLE MATTHY GROVES

The first come down was a raven white,
And the next come down was a polly,|
And the next come down was Lord Thomas's wife,
And she was the fairest of them all, all,
And she was the fairest of them all.

Little Matthy Groves was a-standing by;
She placed her eyes on him,
Saying: "You're the darling of my heart
And the darling of my life.

"It's you no home, no place to lie,
Go home with me this night."
"I think by the rings you wear on your fingers
You are Lord Thomas's wife."

"True I am Lord Thomas's wife,
Lord Thomas is not at home."
The little foot-page was a-standing by,
These words heareth he,
And he licked to his heels and run.

He run, he run to the broken-down bridge,
He bent to his breast and swum;
He swum, he swum to the other, other side,
And he buckled up his shoes and he run.

He run, he run to Lord Thomas's gate,
And he dingled at the ring and it rung,
And he dingled at the ring and it rung.
"What news, what news, my little foot-page?
What news you've brought to me?"
"Little Matthy Groves is at your house
In bed with the gay lady."

"If that be a lie you've brought to me,
And a lie I expect it to be,
If there is e'er a green tree in these whole worlds,
A hangman you shall be.

"If that be the truth you've brought to me,
And the truth I don't expect it to be,
You may wed my youngest daughter,
And you may have all I've got."

Lord Thomas's wife raised up about half a doze asleep.
"Lay still, lay still," little Matthy Groves says,
"Lay still, I tell to thee,
For it's nothing but your father's little shepherd boy
A-driving the wolves from the sheep."

When little Matthy Groves did wake
Lord Thomas was at his feet.
"Rise up, rise up," Lord Thomas he says,
"And put your clothing on,
For it never shall be known in old England
That I slew a naked man.

"How can I rise up, "he says,
"When I am afeard of my life?
For you have two good broad-edged swords
And I have not so much as a knife."

"True I have two good broad swords,
They cost me deep in the purse.
But you may have the very best one,
And you may have the first lick."

The very first lick little Matthy Groves struck,
He struck him across the head,
And the very next lick Lord Thomas he struck,
And it killed little Matthy Groves dead.

He took his gay lady by the hand,
And he led her up and down.
He says: "How do you like my blankets
And how do you like my sheets?"

"Well enough your blankets,
And well enough your sheets,
But much better do I love little Matthy Groves
Within my arms asleep."

He took his gay lady by the hand,
And he pulled her on his knee,
And the very best sword that he did have
He split her head into twine.

SWEET WILLIAM

Sweet William arose on last May morning,
And dressed himself in blue;
"Come tell unto me that long, long love
Between Lyddy Margret and you."

"I know no haim of Lyddy Margret, my love,
I'm sure she knows none of me;
By eight o'clock tomorrow morning
Lyddy Margret my bride shall see."

Lyddy Margret was sitting in her own bower room
A-combing her yellow hair;
She saw Sweet William and his new bride
As they came riding near.

Lyddy Margret threw down her golden comb,
And quickly she bound up her hair;
And away she went from her own bower room,
No more to be seen there.

 The day being past and night come on
When all men were asleep,
Lyddy Margret's ghost came about midnight
And stood at Sweet William's bed feet.

"How do you like your bed?" she said,
"How do you like your sheet;
How do you like that fair ladie
That lies in your arms asleep?"

"Very well I like my bed," he said,
"Very well I like my sheet;
But better I like the fair ladie
That stands at my bed feet."

The night being gone and day come on,
When all men were awake;
Sweet William he rose with trouble on his mind
From the dream that he dreamed last night.

"Such dreams, such dreams as I dreamed last night,
Such dreams are never good;
I dreamed my room was full of wild swine,
My bride bed full of blood."

Sweet William he called his merry men all
By ones, by twos, by threes;
Before them all he asked his bride
If Lyddy Margret he might go see.

"What will you do with Lyddy Margret, my love,
And what will you do with me?"
"Today I go see Lyddy Margret," he said,
"Tomorrow return to thee."

He rode till he came to Lyddy Margret's hall,
And dingled so loud on the ring;
And who so ready as her own brothers
To rise and let him come in?

"Is Margret in her own bower room,
Or is she in her hall,
Or is she in the kitchen
Among her merry maids all?"

"She's neither in the kitchen,
She's neither in her hall;
But she is in her own bower room
Laid out against the wall."

"Raise up, raise up that coffin lid
So I can gaze within;
And let me kiss her clay-cold lips
Lord send it the breath was in."

First he kissed her on the cheek,
And then he kissed her chin;
And then he kissed her clay-cold lips
That oft times had kissed him.

"Fold down, fold down those snowy white sheets,
All made of linen so fine;
Today they hang over Margret's corpse,
Tomorrow hang over mine."

Lyddy Margret died it might have been today,
Sweet William died tomorrow.
Lyddy Margret died for pure, pure love,
Sweet William died for sorrow.

Lyddy Margret was buried in the lower church yard,
Sweet William was buried in the higher;
And out of her grave there sprang a red rose,
And out of his grave a briar.

They grew and they grew to the high church top,
And then they could grow no higher;
And there they tied in a true lover's knot
The red rose and the briar.

THE HOUSE CARPENTER

"Well met, well met, my own true love,
Well met, well met," says he,
"I've just returned from the salt, salt sea,
And it's all for the sake of thee.

"I could have married a king's daughter fair,
And she fain would have married me,
But I refused her crowns of gold,
And it's all for the sake of thee."

"If you could have married a king's daughter fair,
I think 'twould have been your plan,
For I have marry-ed a house carpenter,
And I think him a nice young man."

"If you'll forsake your house carpenter,
And go along with me,
I'll take you where the grass grows green
On the banks of Italy."

She called her babe unto her knee,
And kisses gave it three, Saying,
"Stay at home, you pretty little babe,
Keep your father's company."

She dressed herself in scarlet red,
Most glorious to behold,
And as they sailed the ports all round,
She shone like the glittering gold.

They had not aboard the ship two weeks,
I'm sure it was not three,
When the fair lady began for to weep,
And she wept most bitterlally.

'" 0, is it for my gold that you weep,
Or is it for my store,
'Or is it for your house carpenter,
Whom you ne'er shall see no more?"

"It is not for your gold that I weep,
Nor neither for your store,
But I do mourn for the pretty little babe
That I left on the other shore."

They had not been on board three weeks,
I'm sure it was not four,
When this gallant ship she sprang a leak,
And she sank for to rise no more.

A curse, a curse to that young man,
And a curse to the seaman's life,
A-robbing of the house carpenter
And a-stealing away his wife!

TWO LITTLE BOYS

Two little boys going to school,
Two little boys they be;
Two little boys going to school
To learn their ABC.

"Oh, will you toss a ball with me,
Or will you throw a stone?
Or will you wrestle along with me
On the road as we go home?"

"I will not toss a ball with you,
Nor will I throw a stone,
But I will wrestle along with you,
On the road as we go home."

They wrestled up, they wrestled down,
They wrestled around and around,
And a little penknife run through John's pocket,
And he received a deadly wound.

"Take off, take off my fine cotton shirt,
And tear it from gore to gore,
And bind it around that bloody bloody wound,
That it may bleed no more."

So I took off his fine cotton shirt,
And tore it from gore to gore,
And bound it around that bloody bloody wound,
So it would bleed no more.

"0 what shall I tell your mother, John,
If she inquires for you?"
"0, tell her I've gone to the royal school
My books to bring home."

"0 what shall I tell your sister, John,
If she inquires for you?"
"0, tell her I've gone down to the city,
Some friends for to see."

"0, what shall I tell you true love, John,
If she inquires for you?"
"O, tell her I'm dead and lying in my grave,
Way out in Idaho."

THE CHERRY TREE CAROL

When Joseph was an old man, an old man was he,
He married Virgin Mary, the Queen of Galilee.

As Joseph and Mary were walking one day
Here are apples, here are cherries, enough to behold.

Then Mary spoke to Joseph so meek and so mild,
"Joseph gather me some cherries, for I am with child."

Then Joseph flew in anger, in anger flew he,
"Let the father of the baby gather cherries for thee."

Then Jesus spoke a few words, a few words spoke He,
"Let my mother have some cherries, bow low down, Cherry Tree."

The cherry tree bowed low down, bowed low down
to the ground,
And Mary gathered cherries while Joseph stood around.

Then Joseph took Mary all on his right knee:
"What have I done—Lord have mercy on me!"

Then Joseph took Mary all on his left knee:
"0 tell me little baby, when Thy birthday will be?"

"The sixth day of January my birthday will be,
When the stars in their elements shall tremble with glee."

THE FALSE KNIGHT

"Where are you going?" said the false knight, false knight,
"Where are you going?" said the false knight Munro.
"Well," said the little boy, "I'm going to school,
But I'll stand to my book al-so."

"What you got in your basket?" said the false knight, false knight,
"What you got in your basket?" said the false knight Munro.
"Well," said the little boy, "my breakfast and my dinner,
But I'll stand to my book al-so."

"Give my dog some," said the false knight Munro.
"Give my dog some," said false knight Munro.
"Well," said the little boy, "I won't give him none,
But I'll stand to my book al-so."

"Then I'll pitch you in the well," said the false knight Munro,
"Then I'll pitch you in the well," said the false knight Munro.
"Well," said the little boy, "I'll pitch you in first,
But I'll stand to my book al-so."

And he pitched him in the well and went on to school.

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