Lone Hand Western - Old West History

Antique Utensils Price Guide

This article will introduce you some of the more popular antique utensils as well as pricing information for specific categories.  The items included in this article represent utensils that would be common in the late 1800's (Victorian).  The prices stated in the antique utensil price guide represent the amounts received for items in recent auctions, online sales, etc.  Prices for antique utensils will vary greatly due to condition.

Antique Utensils

No discussion of Victorian cooking would be complete without addressing the antique tools and utensils of the period. The modern kitchen is sparsely equipped compared to its Victorian counterpart. Today's kitchen with its electric food processors, mixers, blenders and mysterious microwave oven would seem like something out of a work of fiction to the Victorian cook. Sure, there was a vast assortment of kitchen tools back then, but those tools allowed the cook a more hands on and personal approach to preparing food. Multiple course meals were a fairly common occurrence and those meals were all prepared using wood or coal fired ranges and used only ice, when it was available, for refrigeration. Victorian food preparation could be an elaborate process that used a variety of graters, molds, pots, pans and utensils but the actual finishing still came down to using basic heat and cold.

As you begin to explore the utensils that were available to the Victorian cook you begin to wonder why they are not still being used today. Many of these kitchen gizmos were used for the preparation of specific menu items. Gem pans, pudding molds, jelly molds, etc. remind us of how much more elaborate cuisine was in days gone by. Meals of the Victorian era resembled an event more than the quick repast they are today and the tools used to prepare those meals can be fascinating in both their appearance and in their function. The utensils and kitchen tools of the 1800's were created to be both functional and pleasing to the eye and as a consequence many specimens will display very well in any type decor.

Cookbooks from the period can make interesting reads due to the fact that they were closer to a household operations manual than purely a cookbook. An example would be the cookbook written by Mrs. Frances E. Owens that has a title page that reads like a advertisement. “Mrs. Owens' Cook Book and Useful Household Hints. Economical household management and the mysteries of the kitchen are as truly a part of domestic culture as are music, decorative art, and the etiquette of the drawing room. To which has been added a Farmers Department containing much valuable information.” More than likely, anyone perusing a book store today who cracked open the cover a cook book and read about etiquette of the drawing room would put the book back on the shelf and move on to the beer can chicken book. Times do change.

Most of the cookbooks from the Victorian era included a chapter that listed the items that would be included in the properly equipped kitchen. The following list is a excerpt from an 1887 cookbook.


Antique Utensil Price Guide

"The following list will show what articles are necessary for the kitchen, and will be quite an aid to young housekeepers when about commencing to furnish the utensils needed in the kitchen department, and may prove useful to many.

weeping brooms and 1 dust-pan.
1 Whisk broom.
1 Bread box.
2 Cake boxes.
1 Large flour box.
1 Dredging box.
1 Large-sized tin pepper box.
1 Spice box containing smaller spice boxes.
2 Cake pans, two sizes.
4 Bread pans.
2 Square biscuit pans.
1 Apple corer.
1 Lemon squeezer.
1 Meat cleaver.
3 Kitchen knives and forks.
1 Large kitchen fork and 4 kitchen spoons, two sizes.
1 Wooden spoon for cake making.
1 Large bread knife.
1 Griddle cake turner, also
1 griddle.
1 Potato masher.
1 Meat board.
1 Dozen patty pans; and the same number of tartlet pans.
1 Large tin pail and 1 wooden pail.
2 Small tin pails.
1 Set of tin basins.
1 Set of tin measures.
1 Wooden butter ladle.
1 Tin skimmer.
1 Tin steamer.
2 Dippers, two sizes.
2 Funnels, two sizes.
1 Set of jelly cake tins.
4 Pie pans.
3 Pudding molds, one for boiling, two for baking, two sizes.
2 Dish pans, two sizes.
2 Cake or biscuit cutters, two sizes.
2 Graters, one large and one small.
1 Coffee canister.
1 Tea canister.

1 Tin or granite-ware teapot.
1 Tin or granite-ware coffeepot.
4 Milk pans, 1 milk strainer.
1 Dozen iron gem pans or muffin rings.
1 Coarse gravy strainer, 1 fine strainer.
1 Colander.
1 Flour sifter.
2 Scoops, one for flour, one for sugar.
2 Jelly molds, two sizes.
1 Can opener, 1 egg beater.
1 Cork screw.
1 Chopping-knife.
2 Wooden chopping-bowls, two sizes.
1 Meat saw.
2 Large earthen bowls.
4 Stone jars.
1 Coffee mill.
1 Candlestick.
2 Market baskets, two sizes.
1 Clock.
1 Ash bucket.
1 Gridiron.
2 Frying pans or spiders, two sizes.
4 Flat-irons, 2 number 8 and 2 number 6.
2 Dripping pans, two sizes.
3 Iron kettles, porcelain lined if possible.
1 Corn beef or fish kettle.
1 Tea-kettle.
2 Granite-ware stew pans, two sizes.
1 Wire toaster.
1 Double kettle for cooking custards, grains, etc.
2 Sugar boxes, one for coarse and one for fine sugar.
1 Waffle iron.
1 Step ladder.
1 Stove, 1 coal shovel.
1 Pair of scales.
2 Coal hods or buckets.
1 Kitchen table, 2 kitchen chairs.
1 Large clothes basket.
1 Wash boiler, 1 wash board.
8 Dozen clothes pins.
1 Large nail hammer and one small tack hammer.
1 Bean pot.
1 Clothes wringer.

Of course, there is no way that any period camp or chuck wagon would have this many culinary items in its arsenal but it is reasonable to assume that any of these items would be available at the time. Any of these items would be appropriate to any cooking situation pertaining to the Victorian era. We can now take some of the items from this list and apply them today's re-enactment of 1800's food preparation.

Spice Box

Pirices for antique spice sets.Spices were a rather valuable commodity during the 1700s and 1800s and were usually kept in a locked container. Spice safes were produced in a variety of styles ranging from small chests of drawers to large tins that contained a number of smaller tins that held the more popular spices of the time. Most of the spice sets from the period contained tins labeled Cloves, Ginger, Cinnamon, Nutmeg, Allspice and Mustard. These sets ranged in appearance from rather plain to boxes decorated with elaborate oriental scenes or gold guilt decorations. Because nut megs were ground as needed, many of the sets included included a nutmeg grater.

Spice sets were one of the artifacts that were handed down through the generations. They remain a popular collectible and are getting to be rather scarce. Most of the earlier tins were finished with a coating known as “Japanned” or “Asphaltum”, a varnish like substance that ranged from a dark copper color to a rich black. In some cases a proud owner tole painted her spice set, these are a wonderful find as each one so unique. Some spice sets were as simple as a handled tin tray containing six tins. Like every type of collectible condition is everything. Prices range from $60.00 plus for the simple tray style tin sets to $150.00 plus for the more elaborately decorated tin boxes with a complete hasp.

Set of tole decorated spice jars and carrying case, mid 19th c., 3 1/2" h., 5 1/2" w. …..........$89.00
Pennsylvania tin wrigglework spice box, 19th c., the lid is decorated 2 1/2"h. 6 ¼ w. ….....$356.00
Primitive, stenciled tin spice carrier box with double flaps. 9 1/4" x 6 1/2" x 4 ¼" ….............$170.00
Vintage Metal Spice Box With Handle, 6 inserts, 10" Wide X 7 1/4" Deep ….......................$149.00
Antique TIN TOLE SPICE SET Canisters & Box Toleware,4 1/4"H. X 8 1/4" W. ….............$88.00
Antique Spice Set with 6 tin canisters, 7" deep x 10" wide x 4" high …..................................$68.00
Vintage Japanned Tin Spice Containers With Handled Carrier, 8"w. x 5 ½" x 5" h. ….........$132.00
Antique Toleware Spice Set, with 6 containers,3” h. x 9” w. 6” d. …......................................$265.00
Antique Spice Set, Oriental Motif, 6 containers, 3 ½ tall x 9 1/4” w. by 6”d. ….....................$150.00
Antique Spice Set, Grand Union Tea Company with 6 containers, 8” x 5.5” x 4” ….............$157.00
Vintage, shabby tin stenciled spice set, 6 canisters, 4 1/4” x 7” x 3 1/4” …............................$65.00
Early Round Spice Box with 7 Individual Tins, Brass Handle, 8 1/2” diameter …..................$65.00

Jappaned Tin Spice Set with Individual Spice Container, 9 1/4” diameter x 3 1/2” high .......$70.00
Spice Set, Tole Painted, 5 Canisters and Nutmeg Grater, 7 1/4” diameter …...........................$150.00
7 piece Tole painted spice set, tray with 6 tole painted tins, 5.5” x 8” x 4” …........................$450.00

Steam Cooker

Price guide for antique steam cookers.Steam cooking is still utilized in Oriental cooking but has fallen out of style with the home cook. There is nothing that compares in flavor to fresh picked garden vegetables that have been steamed to perfection. In fact, entire meals can be steam cooked and they can't be beat for flavor and appearance. Steam cookers used to be available in a variety of sizes ranging from something close to a coffee boiler to a steamer as large as a five gallon can. Many vintage steamers have copper bottoms and are quite attractive while others are made of solid tin or sheet steel. The larger steamers usually had a swinging door at the front and shelves to place different food groups. It is important when shopping for antique steamers to ensure there are no areas that are rusted through. Prices for steamers can run from around $20.00 for smaller specimens to over $100.00 for large-sized specimens like the Mrs. Kinney's steamer pictured.

Steam Cooker, Mrs. Kinney's, 10 1/2” diameter x 18” tall, circa 1899 ..$150.00
Steam Cooker, medium sized, 5 1/2” diameter by 10” high ..................$60.00
Steam Cooker, Ideal Steam Cooker, Toledo .........................................$45.00

Chopping Knife

Price gudie for antique chopping knives.Chopping knives are still a very handy utensil to have in any cooking situation. They work great when coupled with a wooden bowl and came in one to several blade configurations. A good chopping knife can make quick work of dicing or mincing and the single blade variety works great for slicing dough. Many of the early specimens will show tool and hammer marks and will have makers marks stamped into the blade. Single and double tangs are more common with many having wishbone shaped tangs for the double blade style. Expect to pay anywhere from $5.00 for the more recent knives to over $200.00 for the older English specimens.

Antique chopping knife – Zenith. 5 3/4”H x 5 ½ W …..........................................$15.00
Chopping Knife – Double Blade – Circa 1900 4 3/4” H x 6” W ….......................$18.00
Chopping Knife – Universal – Double Blade – 7” H x 6 #/4 W ….......................$20.00
Hand forged chopping knife – Oval Blade – 6 1/2” H x 5” W …..........................$48.00
Antique 19th Century Treenware Bowl With Knife – 6 1/2” H x 4” W …............$32.00
Mezzaluna chopping knife – 1930's -green handle 5 3/8” H x 5 1/2” W …..........$10.00

Small Wares

Prices for antique kitchen utensils.Most small wares from the 1800's resemble the kitchen tools we use today and many of them were manufactured by local tinsmiths or blacksmiths. Wooden spoons were as popular then as they are now and utensils like whips, whisks, spoons, knives, dippers and other items remain pretty much unchanged. For earlier metal pieces look for handles that have been riveted to the business end of the utensil. The pieces will be made of tinned steel or cast iron and in many cases the construction will be asymmetrical. Look for riveted wooden scales on early knifes and forks. Early specimens in good condition will begin in price at around $8.00 and increase in value based on collector interest and scarcity.

Funnel – Tin – 3 1/4” H. x 2 3/4” W. ….........................................................................$4.00
Funnel – Rumford Baking Powder - …..........................................................................$37.00
Funnel – Tin Canning – 2” H. x 4 3/8” W. …................................................................$9.00
Flour Dredger – Tin - 9 7/8” long 2 1/2” diameter - ….................................................$70.00
Dredger or Muffiner – Tin – Domed Top – 5 1/4” H. X 2 3/4” D. 1830s …...............$28.00
Tin scoop – Primitive – 4 3/4” long with 2” width …...................................................$6.00
Tin Flour Scoop – Early Handmade – 3 1/2” L. x 2 1/4” W. …....................................$28.00
Dipper – Tin – 13” in length with 5 1/2” diameter bowl …..........................................$25.00
Dough Bowl and Spoon – Wooden – 14 3/4” D. Spoon 12” L. …...............................$76.00
Spoon – wooden – 13 1/2” L. – turned end …..............................................................$6.00
Spoon – Hand Carved – 15” long – 2” diameter bowl. …............................................$12.50
Spatula – Tin with riveted blade – 14” L. blade width of 3 1/2” …..............................$15.00
Spatula -PA,G. Schmoke", pierced pinwheel decoration, 20 3/4" l. …........................$3978.00
Spatula – Cast iron – 1830 -1850 – 12 1/2” L. …............................................................$76.00
Cake Turner – Perforated blade – 13”L. X 3” blade width ….......................................$5.00
Whisk – bent wire – 1 continuous wire – 13” length …................................................$20.00
Wire Whisk – heavy construction – 16” L. x 4 1/2” W. …............................................$12.00
Egg Separator – Metal Specialties Co. - 4 1/2” L. x 3 1/2” W. ….................................$28.00
Biscuit Cutter – Tin with rolled edges – 3” D. x 1 3/4” H. ….......................................$7.00
Biscuit Cutter – Brown and white graniteware – 2 1/4” D. …......................................$126.00
Biscuit Cutter – 1800's primitive – high with wooden knob …....................................$45.00
Biscuit Cutter – Rumford – 3 3/4” H. x 2” D. …...........................................................$25.00
Biscuit Cutter – Tin with domed top – 2 3/4” D. …......................................................$8.00
Cleaver – Primitive – 15 1/2” L. - 5 1/2” blade …........................................................$38.00
Cleaver – L & I J White – 1837 – 31” L. 12 3/4” blade …...........................................$420.00
Cleaver – Brecht Co. - 35 3/4” L. x 18” blade …..........................................................$255.00
Cleaver – Foster Brothers – 15 1/2” L. x 9” blade …....................................................$140.00
Knife Set – Butcher / Buffalo Hunter – 1800's – 9 knives and steel ….........................$499.00
Knife – Butcher – Brass stars in handle – 17” L. x 12” Blade …..................................$213.00
Knife – Butcher – Ed Wustof – 18 1/8”L. X 12 1/4” blade ….......................................$75.00

Egg Beaters

Price guide for antique egg beaters.The first egg beaters appeared in the 1850's and since that time more than 1000 patents have been awarded for different designs. Dover egg beaters were so popular that at one point the generic term "dovering eggs" was used to describe the egg beating process in recipes. While most beaters were similar in design to today's modern counterpart, there was a huge variety in designs during the last half of the 1800's including Archimedean beaters that could be operated with one hand. Manufacturers to look for are Dover, Horlicks, A & J, Holt's, Browne, Ecko, as well as other small manufacturers. When stocking a vintage chuck box or Victorian style kitchen you can not go wrong with Dover. Depending on its scarcity, the more common beaters will start at around $15.00 and can bring into the thousands of dollars for the very rare specimens.

Another handy beater is known as a cream whip or a batter mixer. This style of beater works almost like a churn and does a wonderful job of whipping cream or mixing pancake batter. Many specimens are unmarked but Fries clearly marked theirs. This style whip was manufactured in three different sizes ranging from ten inches high to nearly thirteen inches high. Near mint examples can go for $175.00 or more.

Egg Beater – P.D. & Co. - 1885 – Very Rare …................................................$750.00
Egg Beater – The Easy – 1886 – Single coiled wire beater ….......................$605.00
Egg Beater – Family – 1876 – Concentric beaters …......................................$475.00
Egg Beater – Dover – 1873 – May 6
th Patent …..............................................$195.00
Egg Beater – Dover letters within crank wheel – 1904 …...............................$88.00
Egg Beater - Holts – Side Handle – 1899 - …...................................................$126.00
Egg Beater – Holts – Mounted on Ball Special Wide Mouth Jar – 1899......$59.00
Cream Whip - Fries – Tin - 10" tall by 6 1/4" by 6 ¾" ….................................$89.00
Egg Beater – King – 1884 – Cranking mechanism attached to jar ….............$763.00
Egg Beater – Keystone – 1880's- Table Mount – 16” H. …............................$460.00
Egg Beater – Taplin – Improved – 1904 – 10 1/2” L. …....................................$90.00
Egg Beater – Archimedean - Wooden knob handle …....................................$30.00

Graters

Prices for antique graters.Graters come in a seemingly endless variety and range from simple in design to quite elaborate. Some early examples are obviously home made as evidenced the uneven punch pattern in the tin. A person can still create a crude grater by punching a series of holes with a nail through a piece of sheet metal– the protrusion at the back of each hole functions just like a grater. Graters ranged in size from small nutmeg graters to the size of a small washboard. Revolving graters were also quite common and make a handy addition to any collection of utensils. Expect to pay from $5.00 for a simple flat grater to several hundred for one of a kind hand made graters or elaborate revolving graters.

Grater – Tin with carved wood back – 16 1/4” L. x 5” W. …...................................$95.00
Grater -Wall hanging tin grater with drawer – 1800's 19” L. x 10” W. …...............$90.00
Grater – Revolving – Houchin – Circa 1872 – Pat. No. 126,144 …..........................$150.00
Grater – Hand punched tin – Wood back – primitive – 12”L. X $” W. ….............$50.00
Grater – Nutmeg – Boyes – 1900's – 5 3/4” L. x 1 3/8 W. ….....................................$60.00
Grater – Nutmeg – Primitive had made – 1800's – 4 1/4” L. x 2” W. …...................$20.00
Grater – Turned wooden handle – 12” L. x 5” W. ….................................................$15.00
Grater - Nutmeg – Coffin style with lid – 1900's …....................................................$15.00
Grater – Wonder Grater – Medium grate – 8 1/2” L. x 4 1/4” W. ….........................$10.00
Grater – Fels Napha – Late 1800's – Embossed- 9” L. x $”W. …..............................$60.00

Molds

History of and prices for antique molds.Molds can be as simple in design as a bread pan or chocolate mold to as elaborate as a tiered castle or a lion. Unfortunately molded food went out of fashion quite some time ago and we have reached the point that a ring of Jello is something to behold. During the Victorian period many foods were served molded including a variety of puddings, terrines, jellies, butter, cakes, ice creams and other items. Molded food may appear to be complicated but jellies can be quite simple to prepare and can be finished in an ice bath. Molded puddings can be steamed in any steamer or even in a covered kettle.

Molds were manufactured from glass, pottery, sheet metal like copper or tin, cast iron and wood. Most butter molds were made of wood and were shaped and functioned almost like a small butter churn. Quite a variety of cast iron molds were used for gems, rolls, corn sticks and other baked menu items. The largest variety were tin and copper molds shaped like everything imaginable. Condition and scarcity is everything when it comes to pricing – a simple melon shaped mold or boarder mold in “Good Condition” can cost $10.00 while you can expect to pay $500.00 or more for scarce copper molds with an elaborate shape.

Jelly Mold – Copper lion shape– English – Dovetailed seam 5 7/8" L. x 4" x W. x 5 ½" H.....$850.00
Jelly Mold – Copper – St. J. C. - Pillared Sides with sculpted top - 5 1/2” H. x 5”D. …......$265.00
Candy Mold – Griswold - Santa Clause – 2 part – 12-1/8" H. X 6-7/8" W. ….....................$250.00
Mold – Corn Stick – Griswold – Cast Iron - #27 …..................................................................$150.00
Pudding Mold – Swirling Leaves – Copper – 8” Diameter 3 1/2” Deep …..........................$155.00
Pudding Mold – Ironstone – Flower – 9” W. 7 1/2” D. x 5 1/2” H. …....................................$78.00
Pudding Mold – Tin – Covered – With Tube – 8 ¼ W x 6 3/4” H. …....................................$68.00
Gem Pan – Erie #8 – Cast Iron - 8 compartment – 12 3/4” L. x 7” W. x 7/8” D. …..................$45.00
French Roll Pan – Griswold – Cast Iron - 6 Compartment – 7 1/2” L. x 5 7/8” W. …..............$45.00
Butter Mold – 1800's – Treenware – Eagle – 3 3/8” diameter x 3” high ….............................$668.00
Butter Mold – C. 1860 – Treenware – Strawberry – 3 3/4” W x 4 3/4” H. …..........................$100.00
Butter Mold - C. 1880 - Carved star design - 2" H x 3.5" W x 7" D ….....................................$98.00
Cookie Mold – Springerle – Heart & Rose – 9” L. x 7” W. …..................................................$406.00
Cookie Mold – Four Heart – C. 1825 – Oak – 15” L. x 7 1/2” W. …........................................$295.00
Cookie Cutter – Tin – International Harvester – 3” Diameter …..........................................$2300.00
Cookie Cutter - Tin – Ginger Bread Boy – 5” H. ….................................................................$8.00

Coffee Mill

Find out what your old coffee mill is worth.Coffee helped fuel the growth of the old west. There probably hasn't been a western movie made that didn't have at least one scene where coffee was served to folks around a cheery campfire or in the ranch house. Arbuckle's coffee became a legend of the west and was a required food stuff during cattle drives. Arbuckle's was the first company to develop a process of pre-roasting coffee beans so the end user had only to grind the beans before brewing. Coffee beans were stocked in chuck wagons in quantities of 100 pounds or more and Arbuckle's shipping crates are very collectible and demand high prices.
Coffee grinders or mills came in the configurations of box or lap mill and wall mounted or side mills. Some examples of coffee mills can go back as far as the early 1800's. A Mr. Garnet Terry designed a mill for coffee, spices, etc. in 1800-1801. The first Parker mills from Meriden, CT. were patented on June 22, 1832, with the first Parker side mill being patented February 7, 1860. Coffee grinders or mills came in the configurations of box or lap mill and wall mounted or side mills. The side mill was typically the type used on a chuck wagon because it was easily mounted to the side of a chuck box and had a low profile. Generally you will find side mills mounted to a board of some type because the board serves as the back of the mill. Other mills had a canister that mounted to the top of the grinding mechanism and used a bracket that served as the mounting device.
Most side mills had a flap type cover embossed with a design and the name of the manufacturer. In cases where the front plate is not embossed with the makers information a small brass tag may be attached. Side mills in good condition can range in price from $50.00 to several hundred dollars.

Coffee Mill – C. Parker - #802 – Floor Model …............................................................$3051.00
Coffee Mill – C. Parker - #15 – Counter Top – Original paint ….................................$950.00
Coffee Mill – C. Parker - #440 – Table Top – 14” H. x 5” x 5” …..................................$380.00
Coffee Mill - C. Parker - #50 – Side Mill – Eagle Tag ….................................................$82.00
Coffee Mill – C. Parker - #60 – Side Mill – Brass Tag …................................................$81.00
Coffee Mill – Landers, Frary & Clark – #70 Counter Top …..........................................$1025.00
Coffee Mill – Enterprise #2 Counter Top – Rare ….........................................................$850.00
Coffee Mill – Arcade – Favorite Mill - Table top …........................................................$185.00
Coffee Mill – Arcade - #3 – Wall Mount – 19” L. ….......................................................$185.00
Coffee Mill – Wilson Increase – Side Mill – Brass Tag …..............................................$125.00
Coffee Mill – John Wright – Table Top – C. 1968 …........................................................$180.00
Coffee Mill – Arcade – Imperial - #707 – Table Top …....................................................$130.00
Coffee Mill – Regal - #44 – Wall Mount – Near Mint …..................................................$208.00
Coffee Mill – Regal – Table Top – C. 1856 …....................................................................$12.95
Coffee Roaster – Royal - #1 – Serial # 1951 …....................................................................$750.00
Coffee Roaster – Harington – C. 1850 – Cast Iron - 9 1/2” D. …......................................$650.00
Coffee Roaster – Perfection – Stove Top – C. 1905 – 11” L. 8” W. ….............................$510.00
Shipping Crate – Arbuckle's Coffee – Angel Design – 29 1/2” W. x 19 1/4” D. x 15” H.....$255.00
Trading Card - Arbuckles – State of Maine …........................................................................$8.00

Dutch Ovens and Cast Iron

History of antique Dutch ovens plus their values.Dutch ovens have remained virtually unchanged for hundreds of years and are a remarkably versatile part of any kitchen. There was not a chuck wagon in the old west that didn't have an assortment of Dutch ovens in a variety of sizes. Although Dutch oven cooking seems like a high art to many people, once the basics of using the device are mastered, they are fairly simple to use. Being this book pertains to Dutch oven cooking we will be concentrating on the three legged variety and its use in Victorian cooking.

One good point about Dutch ovens is that they are very durable. Cast iron, when properly taken care of, can last for hundreds of years and many a oven has been passed down through generations of cooks. Over time an oven will become seasoned and will be as non-stick and easy to work with as Teflon. It is often said that well seasoned cast iron imparts a specific flavor to food that no other utensil can emulate. There is nothing quite like a beef roast slowly cooked in a favorite old oven.

Manufacturers like Lodge and Camp Chef still make wonderful Dutch ovens but it is still possible to find old ovens if you search long enough. Some of the foundry names to look for are Griswold, Wagner, Wapak, Best Made, Carlisle, Phoenix Stove Works, Crescent Foundry Company, Fair, Day & DeKlyne, Glascok, Greer & King, Noyes & Nutter, O'Brian & O'Brian, Pocasset Iron Works, Savery & Company, Stuart Peterson & Company, Western Foundry and others. In addition to Dutch ovens these and other company also made skillets, spiders – a three legged style of frying pan, baking pans, flop griddles, waffle irons and just about everything imaginable.

Older specimens of cast iron will have a foundry mark known as a “gate mark”. The gate mark is the point where the molten iron was poured in to the mold for the piece. This results in a long raised thin line on the bottom of the Dutch oven, spider, gem pan or other item. Gate marks can be found on specimens dating from the mid 1700's to around the 1880's. Carefully inspect any piece of cast iron you consider purchasing as hairline cracks can be difficult to find. Even a small crack can lengthen in a hurry under extreme heat.

Dutch oven – Griswold - #10 – 12” Oven – 5” Deep …......................................................$431.00
Dutch oven – Griswold - Tite Top – 12” Oven - 5” Deep …..............................................$300.00
Dutch oven – U.S.A - #14 – 12” Oven – 4” Deep …............................................................$207.00
Roaster – Griswold - #5 – Oval Shape …...............................................................................$188.00
Spider - Cast Iron - #12 – 11 1/2” D. x 3” Deep ….................................................................$145.00
Spider – Cast Iron - #12 – Lid and Handle marked 12 …......................................................$125.00
Griddle – Griswold - #136 – Grooved top – 14 1/2” x 17 1/2” …..........................................$440.00
Griddle – Early – Cast iron – Hanging Style – 3 Feet ….......................................................$425.00
Frying Pan – Griswold - #2 – Marked Erie 703 …...................................................................$330.00

Graniteware

Price guide for antique graniteware.Graniteware, technically enamelware, traces it's origins to Germany in the early 1800's. A process was developed to coat metals with an enamel finish and the earliest pieces were of solid color.
During a trip to Germany in 1874 William Niedringhaus, who along with his brother Frederick owned a kitchen utensil manufacturing company, noticed enameled utensils in a store display and ultimately ended up purchasing the process. Upon his return to St. Louis the brothers began working on manufacturing enamel coated utensils. The Niedringhaus version of enamelware was coated with ground granite. Graniteware was featured at the 1876 Philly Expo. Graniteware has become the "generic" term for enamelware. True graniteware would have it's origin in Granite City, Illinois.
The introduction of enamelware spelled the demise of most tinware items. The attractive appearance of enamelware and its nearly nonstick coating was much more appealing to the Victorian homemaker than tin with its thin coating and propensity to rust. Enamelware was promoted as being very durable when in fact it chipped very easily. It is very difficult to find older specimens that do not not have at least a few chips or “flea bites”. Many a piece of graniteware has a display face and a non display face due to an ugly blemish sustained years ago.
Most pieces of tinware were made by a tinsmith or a blacksmith while the formed steel used to make graniteware was manufactured on an industrial scale. Due to the automation behind the production of enamelware a huge variety of utensils was possible. Everything from coffee boilers to cookie cutters was produced in abundance and at a low cost. Many very collectible pieces were, at one time, given away as a premium and many pieces retailed for a small amount.
The graniteware specimens that have bold swirl patters in green, blue, red, brown chrysolite and other colors are of more recent manufacture while the mottled gray and solid colored pieces tend to be older. Some brand names to look for are Granite City, Cream City, Tulip, LaFayette, Lisk, Stewart, Savory, Pearl, Volrath, Everbrite, Royal Blue, Agate and countless others. Earlier specimens may have a manufactures mark stamped on the bottom of the piece while later examples usually were labeled with a paper tag which makes identification rather difficult.

Enamelware – Shaker – Blue and White – 2 1/2” H. x 1 1/2” D. …...............................$600.00
Enamelware – Measure – Blue and White – 3 1/2” H. x 3 1/2” D. …...........................$595.00
Enamelware – Tray – End of Day – 13 7/8” L. x 8 3/4” W. ….......................................$395.00
Enamelware - Covered Bucket - Green and White – 5” H. x 5” D. …...........................$384.00
Enamelware - Tea Pot – Chrysolite - 9” H. x 4 3/4” D. …...............................................$175.00
Enamelware – Coffee Boiler – Blue and White – 12” H. x 9” D. …...............................$172.00
Enamelware – Dust Pan – Gray – 10” x 9”........................................................................$161.00
Enamelware – Skimmer – Gray – Agate – 5” x 5” …........................................................$158.00
Enamelware – Muffin Pan – Blue and White – 8 - …......................................................$153.00
Enamelware - Grater – Gray – 8 1/2” H. x 3 3/8” W. ….....................................................$145.00
Enamelware – Funnel – Blue and White – Near Mint …..................................................$99.00
Enamelware – Pudding Mold – Gray – 7 1/2” L. x 6 “W. x 3 1/2” H. …..........................$55.00
Enamelware - Mold – Turks Head – Blue and White - 9” D. x 4 1/2” H. …....................$51.00

Pottery

Pottery price guide.Pottery is an area of collecting that can be endlessly fascinating and rewarding. The process and formulations for manufacture can be traced back hundreds of years and include earthenware, stoneware, ironstone, red ware and other configurations. By its nature, pottery probably has the widest range of style and variety in utilitarian kitchen ware with some specimens that can best be described as art. Some of the early hand thrown crocks are truly beautiful with their muted earth tones and stylized art work. Prices for early specimens, in very good condition, can command breathtaking prices and continue to appreciate in value. Pottery is wonderful to work with when cooking and make beautiful accent pieces in any style of decorating.

Earthenware or pottery bowls can not be surpassed when working with batters or doughs. Bowls of this type hold an even temperature and yeast is very happy in a non metallic environment. Crocks make very nice sourdough containers and can not be beat for counter top storage of flour, sugar and other dry goods. Crocks also work very well for making pickles and will not retain food odors after washing. Pottery baking pans work very well because they heat evenly and retain temperature when removed from the oven or retain coolness when removed from a refrigerator.

Crock – Stoneware – Pennsylvania – 1800's – 4 1/2” x 6 1/2” - Cobalt Decorations ....$2607.00
Crock – Stoneware – Cowden & Wilcox - Harrisburg, PA – C. 1860 – Blue Man in the Moon.....$1352.00
Crock – Stoneware – 3 Gallon – Blue Chicken Pecking Corn – New York – C. 1880 …....$895.00
Crock – Stoneware – 1 Gallon – Red Wing- Large Wing ….................................................$280.00
Crock – Butter – Red Wing – Advertising – Huron Dairy Depot – 3 1/4” H. x 5 1/2” D.....$256.00
Crock – Western Monmouth - #4 Weir Lock Top – C. 1892 – 8 1/2” H. x 5 1/2” D. ….......$440.00
Crock – Western – #2 - “Cold Drink” Printed inside maple leaf ….......................................$200.00
Mold – Red Ware – Hand Thrown with ribbed sides - 4” H. x 8 1/2” D. ….........................$52.00
Mold – Stoneware – Pudding – Rabbit, Squirrel, Flower – 7” x 5 1/4” x 4” H. …................$370.00
Mold – Stoneware – Yellow Ware – Flower Basket – 6” x 4 7/8” x 3” H. ….........................$228.00
Mold – Stoneware – Pudding or Jelly - Corn – 8 1/2” x 6 1/2” x 4” H. …...............................$85.00
Bowl – Stoneware - Red Wing – Blue and White Lilly - ….....................................................$410.00
Bowl – Stoneware – Salt Bowl - Sleepy Eye – Blue “Chief Sleepy Eye” 6 1/2” D. x 4” H.....$300.00
Bowl – Stoneware – Advertising – Whitman Coop – 9 1/2” D. x 5” H. ….............................$200.00
Bowl – Stoneware – Shoulder – Spongeware – 8 1/4” D. x 4 3/4” H. …..................................$31.00
Bowl - Stoneware - Red Wing – Spongeware – Panels – 5” …...............................................$361.00
Pitcher – Stoneware – Wells & Richards – PA. - 1800's - …..................................................$9300.00
Pitcher – Stoneware – Blue and White - Columns and Arches …...........................................$375.00
Pitcher – Stoneware – Spongeware – Blue and White – 9” H. …............................................$199.00
Pitcher – Stoneware – Spongeware – 6 3/4” H. …......................................................................$75.00
Milk Pan – Stoneware – Spongeware – 12” D. x 2 1/2” H. ….....................................................$32.00
Jar - Stoneware – A. P. Donaghho - C. 1880 – 9 3/4” H. x 6” D. …..........................................$3000.00
Jar - Stoneware – Red Wing Union – 5 Gallon – Lid & Bail ….................................................$240.00
Jar – Stoneware – Red Wing – Pantry Jar – 4 1/2” H. x 3 1/2” D. ….......................................$250.00
Jar – Stoneware – Alfred Jones & Sons - Oyster Jar - …........................................................$189.00
Cake Crock – Stoneware - Peter Herman – 1800's – 13 3/4” D. x 7 1/2” H. ….......................$1300.00
Butter Churn – Red Wing – 4” Wing – 3 Gallon – Missing lid and plunger........................$50.00

 

Back To Chuck Wagon Antiques